Skip to main content

Connect 360: QEP References

References

 

REFERENCES

Acai, A., Cowan, V., Doherty, S., Sharma, G., and Thevathasan, N. (2014). Exploring the role of the university student as an experiential learner: Thoughts and reflections from the 2013 cohort of 3M National Student Fellows. Collected Essays on Learning and Teaching, 7(2), 1-11.

Arum, R. and Roksa, J.  (2011).  Academically adrift: Limited learning on college campuses.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Austin, M. J. and Rusty, D. Z. (2015). Developing an experiential learning program: Milestones and challenges. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 27(1), 143-153.

Bloch-Schulman and Jovanovic, S. (2010). Who‘s afraid of politics? On the need to teach political engagement. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 14(1), 83-100.

Boyer, E. L. (1996). From scholarship reconsidered to scholarship assessed. Quest, 48, 129- 139.

Brundiers, K., Wiek, A., and Redman, C. (2010). Real-world learning opportunities in sustainability: From classroom into the real world. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 11(4), 308-324.

Canadian Council on Learning. (2008).The benefits of experiential learning. Ottawa: Canadian Council on Learning.

Chavan, M. (2011). Higher education students’ attitudes towards experiential learning in international business. Journal of Teaching in International Business, 22(2), 126-143.

Coker, J. S., and Porter, D. J. (2015). Maximizing experiential learning for student success. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 47(1), 66-72.

Cone, R. (2003). Service-learning and civic education: Challenging assumptions. Peer Review, 5(3), 12-15.

 

Dallimore, E., Rochefort, D. A., and Simonelli, K. (2010). Community-based learning and research. New Directions For Teaching and Learning. 24, 15-22. 8p. DOI: 10.1002/tl.416.

Espinosa, L. (2011). Pipelines and pathways: Women of color in undergraduate STEM majors and the college experiences that contribute to persistence. Harvard Educational Review, 81(2), 209-241.

Eyler, J. (2009). The power of experiential education. Liberal Education. 95(4), 24-31.

Fink, L. D. (2013). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Hagenbuch, D. J. (2006). Service learning inputs and outcomes in a personal selling course. Journal of Marketing Education, 28, 26-34.

Hart Research Associates. (2013). It takes more than a major: Employer priorities for college learning and student success. An online survey among employers conducted on behalf of: the Association of American Colleges and Universities. Washington D.C.: Hart Research Associates.

Hersh, R. H. and Merrow, J.  (1996).  Declining by degrees: Higher education at risk.  New York: St. Martin's Griffin.

Higgins, T. B., Brown, K. L., Gillmore, J. G., Johnson, J. B., Peaslee, G. F., and Stanford, D. J. (2011). Successful student transitions from the community college to the four-year college facilitated by undergraduate research. Council on Undergraduate Research Quarterly. 31(3), 16-23.

Hodge, D. C., Baxter Magolda, M. B., and Haynes, C. A. (2009). Engaged learning: Enabling self-authorship and effective practice. A paper commissioned for the Conference on Liberal Education and Effective Practice, Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise, Clark University.

Houle, C. (1976). Deep traditions of experiential learning. In Morris T. Keaton and Associates (Ed). Experiential learning: Rationale, characteristics, and assessment. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 19-33.

Jarmon, L., Traphagan, T., Mayrath, M., and Trivedi, A. (2009). Virtual world teaching, experiential learning, and assessment: An interdisciplinary communication course in Second Life. Computers and Education, 53, 169-182.

Jarvis, P. (2006). Towards a comprehensive theory of human learning. London: Routledge.

Jones, M.T., Barlow, A.E., and Villarejo, M. (2010). Importance of undergraduate research for minority persistence and achievement in biology. Journal of Higher Education, 81(1), 82-115.

Katula, R. A., and Threnhauser, E. (1999). Experiential education in the undergraduate curriculum, Communication Education, 48(3), 238. doi: 10.1080/03634529909379172

Keeton, Morris T. and Associates (Eds.). (1976). Experiential learning: Rationale, characteristics, and assessment. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Kilgo, C. A., Sheets, J. K. E., and Pascarella, E. T. (2015). The link between high-impact practices and student learning: Some longitudinal evidence. Higher Education, 69(4), 509-525.

Kindelan, N. (2010). Demystifying experiential learning in the performing arts. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, (124), 31-37.

Kolb, D. A. (1984). Experiential learning: Experience as the sources of learning and development. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Kolb, D. A. (2015). Experiential learning: Experience as the sources of learning and development, 2nd Ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

Kolb, A. Y., and Kolb, D. A. (2005). Learning styles and learning spaces: Enhancing experiential learning in higher education. Academy of management learning and education, 4(2), 193-212.

Kuh, G. (Ed.). (2008). High impact practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter. Washington D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities

Kuh, George D. (2013). Taking HIPs to the next level. In G. D. Kuh  and K. O’Donnell (Eds.). Ensuring quality and taking high impact practices to scale. Washington, D.C., Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Martin, A., Fleming, J., Ferkins, L., Wiersma, C., and Coll, R. (2010). Facilitating and integrating learning within sport studies cooperative education: Exploring the pedagogies employed by students, academics and workplace supervisors. Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism Education, 9(1), 24-38.

National Society for Experiential Education (1998). Eight principles of good practice for all experiential learning activities

O’Donnell, K. (2013). Bringing HIPs to scale: Turning good practices into lasting policy. In G. D. Kuh and K. O’Donnell (Eds.). Ensuring quality and taking high impact practices to scale. Washington, D.C., Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Ong, M., Wright, C., Espinosa, L. L., and Orfield, G. (2011). Inside the double bind: A synthesis of empirical research on undergraduate and graduate women of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Harvard Educational Review, 81(2), 172-390.

Qualters, D. M. (2010). Bringing the outside in: Assessing experiential education. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2010(124), 55-62 (EJ912853), DOI: 10.1002/tl.421

Perrin, J. (2014). Features of engaging and empowering experiential learning programs for college students. Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, 11(2).

Reed, S. (2013). Case studies In G. D. Kuh  and K. O’Donnell (Eds.). Ensuring quality and taking high impact practices to scale. Washington, D.C., Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Rhodes, T. L. (Ed.).  (2010).  Assessing outcomes and improving achievement: Tips and tools for using rubrics.  Washington, D.C., Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Schenck, J. and Cruickshank, J. (2015). Evolving Kolb: Experiential education in the age of neuroscience. Journal of Experiential Education, 38(1), 73-95.

Schneider, C. G. (2008). Liberal education and high impact practices: Making excellence – once and for all – inclusive. In G. Kuh, High impact practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter. Washington D.C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Schon, D.A. (1983). The reflective practitioner: How professionals think in action. New York: Basic Books.

Scovill, S. M., and Waite, M. D. (2012). Linking theory to practice: Experiential learning in an employee wellness practicum. American Journal of Health Sciences, 3(4), 261-268.

Simons, L., Fehr, L., Blank, N., Connell, H., Georganas, D., Fernandez, D., and Peterson, V. (2012). Lessons learned from experiential learning: What do students learn from a practicum/internship? International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 24(3), 325-334.

Smith, C. (2014). Assessment of student outcomes from work-integrated learning: Validity and reliability. Asia-Pacific Journal of Cooperative Education, 15(3), 209-223.

Sperber, M.  (2001).  Beer and circus: How big-time college sports is crippling undergraduate education. New York: Holt Paperbacks

Sweitzer, H. F. and King, M. A. (2014). The successful internship: Personal, professional, and civic development in experiential learning, 4th Ed. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning.

Texas A&M University-Texarkana. (2014). Focus Group Data Assessment for Academic Master Plan Committee.  Unpublished Manuscript.

Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.  (2014). Online resume for legislators and other policymakers: Texas A&M University-Texarkana [Data file].  

Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.  (2014). Online resume for prospective students, parents, and the public: Texas A&M University-Texarkana [Data file].  

United States Census Bureau.  (2013).  CPH-T-5: Population change for metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas in the United States and Puerto Rico (February 2013 delineations): 2000 to 2010.  2010 Census Population and Housing Tables.  Retrieved from https://www.census.gov/population/www/cen2010/cph-t/CPH-T-5.pdf.

United States Census Bureau. (2015). Table generated by Tom Jordan using QuickFacts Beta

Waters, S. E. (2015). The higher educational institution assesses the community partnership in service learning: One strategy for institutionalizing service learning. Journal of Community Engagement and Higher Education, 7(1), 1-13.

Weinstein, N. (2008). Experiential learning. Research Starters: Education. EBSCO Publishing.